Events at the UAH Library (beginning of March)

There’s a lot going on at the M. Louis Salmon Library!  Here are some of our upcoming events at the beginning of March 2015, before Spring Break:

March 04: Alumni Lunch & Learn / Refined Researcher Series “Accessing Government Statistical Information Online”

As a governmental data resource, statistical information is an important and valued source of information. Seth Porter will give a presentation covering the background of government statistics, accessing the most valuable resources for this information, and the importance of these resources and skills. This will be an overview of the best Open Source information sources. Join us at 11:30 AM-12:30 PM and learn about government statistics.

The free webinar version of this talk is open to all! Just use the following link: Register for the free webinar version of Seth’s talk. 

For more information, see the library calendar of events here.

 

March 10: Refined Researcher Series “Endnote II: The Endnote Strikes Back”

This talk expands upon Ron Schwertfeger’s workshop on the basic usage of Endnote, the premium citation manager.  this follow-up workshop goes beyond the tasks of adding and inserting citations to getting the most out of this program with increased interconnection and increased utility. This hands-on workshop will include such topics as:

  •  Adding & managing citations from Endnote into your paper using Microsoft Word
  • Using groups, smart groups, and ratings to organize a hectic library
  • Sharing groups of references to collaborate with peers and classmates
  • Using Endnote with Activity Insight for tenure review

Come to Salmon Library room 111 on March 10th at 2:00 PM.  Bring your own device and follow along to become an Endnote ninja!  For more information, see the library calendar of events here.

 

March 10: Moon Express – The Race Back to the Moon and The Future of Commercial Space Flight

Award winning inventor, entrepreneur, engineer, and educator Tim Pickens will be talking about the race back to the Moon and the future of commercial space flight. This event will take place at 5:30 PM-7:30 PM in Salmon Library Room 111. The agenda for the meeting will be as follows:

  •  5:30pm – Social Time
  • 6:00pm – Dinner
  • 6:30pm – Talk
  • 7:30pm – Close

You must RSVP by March 07 to attend; please contact Belinda Ong (belinda.ong@uah.edu) to RSVP.  For more information, see the library calendar of events here.

 

March 12: Refined Researcher Series “Get Some CULTURE!”

Research in different cultures can be difficult due to problems such as the difference in meaning of common symbols/actions and due to the inherent issues of gathering people under occasional arbitrary constraints. Michael Manasco will demonstrate powerful research tools and how to overcome these elements on Thursday, March 12 at 12:00 PM- 12:45 PM in Salmon Library room 214. Focus will be given to eHRAF (electronic Human Relations Area File) for ethnographic research. This talk is open to all! Note: Some databases will require a UAH login.  Pizza and drinks will be provided.

For more information, see the library calendar of events here.

 

March 19: Refined Researcher Series “UAH Alumni Access at the Library”

Are you a UAH alumnus / alumna?  Or are you about to graduate?

Join us at 5:30 PM in Salmon Library room 111, as Doug Bolden addresses the particulars about what you need to do to get alumni access to the library and some of the things you can do with library collections: research, finding materials, and getting books to read. If you need to get an Alumni Association Card (which is now free), contact the UAH Alumni association at http://www.uah.edu/alumni.

This talk is open to all!  It is aimed at UAH alumni and people who will soon be graduating.

For more information, see the library calendar of events here.

 

 

A few pictures of [late night] snow from around the library

Here are three pictures of snow taken around 11pm to midnight on Wednesday, February 25. The snow was still falling at that time (but starting to slow down) and the Salmon Library had a few inches built up out front.I wanted to make sure I got a picture of the Geode covered in snow. Because why not.

Unfortunately the camera started fogging up in the snow and so the pictures became a bit…esoteric…as it went along. Here are three that turned out fairly well, and one that is blurry enough (of a rather pretty tree covered in snow right outside of the library) that you have to a little faith that it’s not a strange digital art project.

Front of Salmon Library, snow building up on sign

The Geode outside of the Library, covered in snow

Snow covered tree from near the Salmon Library parking lot

Tree right outside of the Salmon Library, covered in snow, but blurry due to an increasingly fogged up camera

Any great pictures you want to share of UAH and the Salmon Library covered in snow? Send them to doug.bolden@uah.edu and I’ll work on compiling a second post!

Five questions to be tackled with the upcoming talk: Welcome to the Future History of the Book.

This coming up Thursday, in Salmon Library room 111 at 5:30pm, I will host a talk, Welcome to the Future History of the Book. It will be a look at the past, present, and future of the book, of information technology, of literacy, and of several related topics. It will blend headlines and actions related to the promotion (or destruction) of books and information and face several questions head on. Five of those are below.

This talk is open and free to all. Bring a friend!

Question 1. What is a book?

Both in the sense of being hard to say what does and does not constitute a book (for instance, do audiobooks count? Do ebooks? Do collections of articles? Short stories? Does it have to be intended to be a book? Does it have to be a good book? Is there a certain minimum page count? A certain minimum Lexile rating?) but also in the sense of saying what degree of bookness something has to have to receive the sense of an elevated status. There will be a short demonstration of this difficultly.

Question 2. Is the book really dying?

No. Changing, sure, but that was bound to happen (pun not intended). However, it might get complicated.

Question 3. If the book isn’t really dying, why have there been so many articles about the death of books?

Conversely, if the book really was dying, to whom would all those articles be appealing? What is the purpose of worrying about the death of books (and libraries, literacy, etc) if it is really inevitable and no one cares?

Question 4. Can information technology be disruptive but not destructive?

Think about the printing press, the automated printing press, cheaper paper, emails, instant messages, text messages, FaceTime, VHS cassettes, CDs, lossless music files. Each of these things altered something that was before and changed how the average person interacts with information. Suddenly your average person could afford a book, or could store entire music libraries on a device that fit in their hand, or could record a favorite TV show and watch it later. Most of these things have been decried by someone, and some of them have had a major impact on our daily lives, but rarely do they destroy the core of the medium. Sure, your laser discs might not work any more, but the principle of watching movies at home has not be utterly destroyed, merely improved (for whom is a whole other question).

Question 5. What might a book look like in 50 years? 100?

Now we’re talking. Maybe literally!

See the flyer below if you want to see more information. Or go to the Welcome to the Future History of the Book event page. You can contact me at doug.bolden@uah.edu for more information, if you need.

The Return of Zotero / Refined Researcher Series

 

Flyer for workshop The Return Of Zotero

Are you looking for ways to use the Zotero freeware to more effectively manage your research citations? We are here to help!  As the next session in our Refined Researcher series, I will lead a short, hands-on workshop to take your Zotero expertise to the next level.

During this event, I will talk about how to get more than just citations out of this program, including such topics as:

  • How to organize and manage items in your library with collections, tags and notes.
  • How to use Zotero from your iPad/iPhone.
  • How to share your Zotero references with partners for group projects .
  • How to use Zotero to prepare a list of your publications for Activity Insight (if you are a teacher who is coming up for tenure review).

This session will be offered on February 24th at 2 pm in the Salmon Library, Room 214.

These advanced tricks and power user tactics will help fulfill even the most dedicated researcher’s needs. Please feel free to bring your own laptop or tablet to practice on your own.

This talk is open to all.  More information about the session (& my email address if you want to RSVP) is available on the event posting here.

You can find out more about our other upcoming sessions on the library calendar of events.

See you there!

Flyer for workshop The Return Of Zotero

 

“Now It’s Personal!” : biographical research workshop tonight at 5:30

Biographical research is more than just discovering when a person was born. It’s also about exploring the impact that individual had on their community and even the course of history. I’ll be hosting a session of our “Refined Researcher” series tonight on how to conduct biographical research at UAH with our various databases, from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm in the Salmon Library, Room 214. During this event, we’ll cover:

  • What constitutes biographical data
  • Types of biographical materials that are available in the library
  • Focus on The American National Biography and The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

We’ll talk about using our available resources to help you learn about the important people—the movers and the shakers—and the major trends they started that have shaped society into what it is today. And, of course, the little moments that make learning about history so much fun! Come learn how to research the historical figures who have made their mark on the world. Who knows? It may come in handy for your next research paper.

Information from last night’s talk on copyleft: The Left Side of Copy[right]

opening shot for the talk, showing a circle and the title "Left Side of [Copy]right"

As mentioned in the previous blog post, I held a talk about copyleft and issues surrounding it and copyright: “The Left Side of Copy[right]“. As I do, I felt it would be good to share the complete presentation here. The talk, and original the graphics involved, are all released CC-BY 4.0 International (something that will make sense to you  as you go through the presentation). Links to a zip file containing the graphics (as both PNG and XCF files) is down below.

Up next for me is the February 26th talk: Welcome to the Future History of the Book. Where I will simultaneously answer the question, “Is the book doomed?,” and demonstrate the problems with actually answering the question, “What’s a book?”. And no, I’m not being facetious.

Five Reasons to Come to My Upcoming Copyleft Talk

In just a few days (February 3, at 5:30pm, Salmon Library room 111), I am going to be giving a talk about copyleft. You can see more information about it on the event page: The Left Side of [Copy]right. A flyer is down below, click to get a big printable one.

Why should you attend? Here are just five reasons.

1. Copyleft is fun to learn about

What is it? Well, right now I am using terms like “copyright’s cousin” ; really,  though, it is a wide collection of ideals generally built around the notion that information works best when it is easier to share and to remix.

2. Copyright is not a perfect system

I personally like copyright, and recognize a lot of good that it has done. However, it is not a perfect system. At the talk, I will bring up some of its flaws, especially the ones that copyleft can help to solve.

3. Copyleft helps add to the share/remix aspects of culture’s dialogue

Culture can be thought of as a dialogue of shared ideas and remixed older concepts. Copyleft has built in notions for how to inspire more sharing and more remixing.

4. Open Access can help to all levels of academic research

While open access sometimes fails a purely-copyleft test, by making research information more freely available, and more available for follow-ups and wider peer review, it can help all levels of academic research from those publishing articles all the way down to students driven to find cutting edge research.

5. Where did the sort of silly name, “Left Side of [Copy]right” come from?

Well, that’s one I’ll save for the talk.

Some reminders. This is open to all. It is free. It requires no RSVP, but I like to have a “RSVP Form” you can fill in if you have questions you would like me to specifically answer

Upcoming Author Talk. John William Davis to discuss Rainy Street Stories: Reflections on Secret Wars, Espionage, and Terrorism.

On February 12, 2015, at 5:30, the Salmon Library will be hosting author John William Davis at a book talk about his own Rainy Street Stories: Reflections on Secret Wars, Espionage, and Terrorism. Come out to listen to his anecdotes, ask him questions, and enjoy some light refreshments. The talk will be in Library room 111.

Rainy Street Stories Event

From the publisher’s [Red Bike Publishing] website:

Rainy Street Stories is a composition of powerful reflections on today’s espionage, terrorism, and secret wars. These stories, essays, and poems by John Davis, a retired intelligence officer, take place from Europe, to Asia, and back to the Americas. He lived overseas for many years, where he served as a soldier, civil servant, and gifted linguist. Davis writes with a thoughtful, compassionate, and fair assessment of his lifetime lived during wars and conflicts which were his generation’s legacy from World War II. He recounts mysterious, sometimes strangely suggestive, even curiously puzzling tales. Each will cause the reader to think.

You can read reviews of the book from The SOHO Journal and from The Journal of Strategic Security. In SOHO’s review, D. Clark MacPherson writes:

Davis’s Rainy Street Stories does not gloss over lines with the novelist’s adroitness as does LeCarre, nor does he appear to draw upon the wealth of knowledge that Nigel West, the “Godfather of Intelligence,” draws upon as the acknowledged historian of the Intelligence field. Instead, the reader is drawn into a collaboration with Davis in understanding the moral dilemma and making the difficult philosophical decisions about how we proceed from here. Davis enables the reader to travel with him by using short essays and poems that evoke the feelings and experiences of fear, betrayal, pain and death that are intrinsic and inescapable elements of the secret and not-so-secret wars.

Those with questions can contact Dr. Belinda Ong at ongb@uah.edu or by phone at 256.824.6432.

Those who wish to buy a copy of the book can do so through Amazon, through Barnes and Noble, or [if they prefer to find a local brick-and-mortar that carries it], can search through IndieBound.

Interlibrary Loan Announces Holiday Deadlines

Faculty, staff and students wishing to use Interlibrary Loan services between the dates of December 12, 2014 and January 4, 2015 should take note of the following deadlines and plan research materials accordingly.

  • Book requests submitted after December 12, 2014 may not be processed until January 5, 2015.
  • Article requests submitted after December 16, 2014 may not be processed until January 5, 2015.
  • The Interlibrary Loan Department will be closed December 22. 2014 through January 4, 2015.
  • The Interlibrary Loan Department will resume normal operations January 5, 2015.

Extended Hours in the Library for Fall 2014 Finals

During Finals, many wish for just a few more hours in the day to squeeze in one more rewrite of a paper or to study one more chapter. And while the Salmon Library has very little power to add hours to the age-old day-night cycle, we can do our part and extend those existing hours of the day which we are open.

A 16 hour clock

From November 30, a Sunday, through December 9, a Tuesday, we will have extended hours. We will open on the normal times, but our closing times for those days are changed:

  • Sunday through Thursday: We’re open until 2am.
  • Friday: We’re open until 10pm.
  • We do not have extended hours on Saturdays.

The extended hours will include services such as the Info Arcade being open; printing, photocopying, and scanning; being able to check out study rooms and laptops; and of course the quiet study on the second and third floors.

The following calendar shows the extended hours and the Finals ReCharge events in case you want to plan around them:

Extended hours for the library, combined with finals recharge events. A visual representation of this and the Finals ReCharge posts.

As a note, as you are planning out your studying/writing/etc for Finals, the Student Success Center is now located in the Salmon Library, on the first floor, in the Charger Commons. If you need tutoring or writing help, they are a great resource!

If you want more information about the Salmon Library Hours, see our Hours Guide.